LOS ANGELES NEWS

Residents, including disadvantaged and veteran workers, soon will have an easier time being recruited to work on public construction projects in the city.

The City Council on Tuesday voted 6-2 to have the city manager start negotiating a project labor agreement with the Los Angeles/Orange Counties Building And Construction Trades Council and other trade groups. City Councilman Dee Andrews was absent.

This type of agreement requires contractors for city construction projects to follow labor rules set by the city.

Residents, including disadvantaged and veteran workers, soon will have an easier time being recruited to work on public construction projects in the city.

The City Council on Tuesday voted 6-2 to have the city manager start negotiating a project labor agreement with the Los Angeles/Orange Counties Building And Construction Trades Council and other trade groups. City Councilman Dee Andrews was absent.

This type of agreement requires contractors for city construction projects to follow labor rules set by the city.

For 10 years, Chief Executive magazine has conducted an annual survey of the nation’s CEOs, and every time California has been rated the state most hostile to business. The collapse of a plan to bring hundreds of well-paying jobs to economically depressed Palmdale in northern Los Angeles County shows why.

As reported here, the Long Beach City Council recently and unanimously approved a recommendation from Council members Lena Gonzalez, Robert Uranga, and Al Austin to “direct (the) City Manager to negotiate a Citywide Project Labor Agreement (PLA) with the Los Angeles/Orange Counties Building and Construction Trades Council, and specified Craft Councils and Local Participants.”

Our readers may review the specific Council Item, as well as the support documentation provided, by clicking here and I encourage them to do so.

Long Beach Press Telegram

Long Beach is about to become a serious union town and residents should be paying attention.

The city has always had deep union roots with residents passing a ground-breaking, union-backed measure in 2012 that forced hotels to either allow unionization or pay workers at least $13 an hour. Then, there’s the Longshoremen and Teamsters who have taken a strong place in the city’s blue collar workforce.

In the past eight months Metro has employed over 350 workers in the construction of the Crenshaw Line. Guided by hiring goals outlined in the Project Labor Agreement, Metro is working to create "construction employment and training opportunities to many who reside along the Crenshaw/LAX Transit Project."

The Project Labor Agreement commits Metro to hiring 40 percent of its construction workers from economically disadvantaged areas and 10 percent from disadvantaged populations—including veterans, ex-cons and emancipated foster care youth. The agreement further commits Metro to making 20 percent of its workers apprentices, having received at least 4,000 hours of training in a particular trade.

"I am proud that the MTA Board voted unanimously to become the first transit agency in the nation to use federal and local dollars to create jobs targeted at economically disadvantaged communities and individuals," said former Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa when Metro committed itself to the Project Labor Agreement back in 2012. "This landmark program is part of a strategy to deliver public transit projects while creating jobs that will lift people out of poverty and into the middle class."

The Young Black Contractors Association filed a $500 million claim against the county of Los Angeles Monday for its alleged failure to enforce federal and state laws and its own project labor agreement and construction careers policy with respect to the employment of African-Americans on construction projects throughout the county.


The claim, which is the legally required precursor to a formal lawsuit, is specifically aimed at the county Board of Supervisors and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.


Filed by attorney Reginald P. Mason, the claim specifically charges MTA of abetting "prime contractors' systemic and continuous violation of its own [labor agreements and policies] and federal and state laws that give rise to claims for fraud, waste and abuse, including but not limited to false and deceptive business practices under California's Business Professions Code."

 

With the Oxnard Union High School District trying to build a Camarillo school in time for the fall 2015 semester, the school board is selecting a contractor without going through the traditional bidding process.

The board Wednesday night unanimously approved a lease/lease-back plan to build Rancho Campana High School in Camarillo.

State law allows school districts to use this funding mechanism of leasing property to a contractor and then leasing it back. School officials estimate this method will increase the cost of the project about 5 percent.

Lack of Blacks Hired on Phase I of Crenshaw Rail Project

The Metro Transportation Authority (MTA) pledged significant African American participation during the construction phase of the Metro Crenshaw/LAX Transit Corridor and also signed a project labor agreement to ensure that Blacks received adequate employment representation, but contractors have drastically under performed in the hiring of African Americans in the first phase of the Crenshaw Advanced Utilities Relocation PLA for Targeted Worker Attainment.

According to MTA internal documents obtained by the Sentinel, which revealed the number of individual hires, Blacks ranked lower than any other demographic group.

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